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Xue Mei Rhodin

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Design the perfect weekly schedule

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 11 December 2014

Design_the_perfect_weekly_schedule_featrued_imageI've received so much value from Roger Hamilton's methods and teachings on business and entreprenurship. This teaching on designing your weekly schedule around natural rhythms has made me more productive and have a clearer mind though my week. One of our main focuses at Startup Cabin is self leadership. This kind of structure goes a long way in helping you keep yourself on track to meeting your goals. See if you can apply this to your life and let us know how it works out.

 

 

 

Download the Playbook to create your weekly rhythm here: http://www.geniusu.com/missions/3/ste...

Connect with Roger on Facebook: http://bit.ly/fb-roger
Connect with Roger on Twitter: http://bit.ly/tw-roger
Connect with Roger on Google+: http://bit.ly/gp-roger

About Roger: Roger James Hamilton is a futurist, social entrepreneur and New York Times Bestselling Author of the Millionaire Master Plan. He is the founder of Entrepreneurs Institute and the creator of the Wealth Dynamics, Talent Dynamics & Genius Test Profiling Systems, used by over 250,000 entrepreneurs to follow their flow.

Visit Roger's site at http://www.rogerjameshamilton.com
Discover your Genius for free at http://www.mygeniustest.com
Join the GeniusU Online University for free at http://www.geniusu.com

Topics: Marketing Strategy

Don’t make these 5 mistakes of young entrepreneurs.

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 05 December 2014

5_mistakes_young_ent._feature_image

When you have startup rockstars and wiz kids from places like Facebook, Spotify, Uber and Oculus Rift plastered all over the media, it's easy to get caught in the hype and head off to be the next hot startup.

Those rockstars though are mostly 2nd level entrepreneurs who have had companies before. They have won and failed multiple times before we see them, and they have learned some things that unexperienced entrepreneurs have not.

Here are 5 common mistakes you should avoid as a young entrepreneur:

Many 1st level startup entrepreneurs.....

1. They think their idea is enough.

They love to talk about their idea. “I want to do this idea.” They don’t explain why they are the right fit, have the right team, or why they are in that market. When business advisors ask them who their competitors are and why they are in that market, they usually don’t have an answer.

2. They don’t want to take advice.

Their insecurity leads them to act as though they know stuff they really don’t. They don’t want to look stupid, so they act arrogant, and still look stupid. They don’t understand the reality that we all have times where we are clueless. And we need to be able to admit it and learn.

A mentor of mine had the opportunity to meet with Richard Branson. The first thing Richard did was ask him like 20 questions. He didn’t start spouting off what he thought, he asked questions. He is always looking for new input. He may not take all the advice he extracts, but he is keen on getting research and new angels on what he is doing. 

Experienced entrepreneurs are always wanting to get new perspectives and feedback. They are not holding their ideas too tightly. Anything that will make what they are doing better or more useful is good. Even if it isn’t as pretty as they first dreamed.

3. They don’t know the difference between a freelancer and an entrepreneur.

And they don’t know the difference between a freelancer, business owner, and entrepreneurial innovator.
  • A freelancer works hours for other companies, and has no security.
  • A business owner manages a consistent process and is not creating anything new. These are more traditional businesses like franchises, law firms and so on.
  • An entrepreneur is trying to make stuff better. They want to build a “new kind of law firm”, and change the face of the market.
What are you?

4. They miss the value of good, everyday business owners.

They may not be on the cover a magazine, but they have built a team and know how to sell really well. Good business owners are everywhere, and they can teach us about sticking to a process day after day. There’s virtue in enduring through the years as you build up your company. This is one virtue 1st level entrepreneurs miss out on. They are not ready to do the daily work.

5. They underestimate relationships.

This is a huge deal!
  • They think that they can have a great skill, and not worry about connecting with people.
  • They will stand off to the side of mingle events.
  • They don’t know how to behave at a professional networking event. 
  • They will start to look around while someone is talking to them, because that person is not valuable or interesting. And they think their “I’m getting bored” thoughts don’t show. Mature business people can spot this behaviour from across a room and immediately write that rude person off.

This will cost immature entrepreneurs many contacts.Your personal brand is tied to your business, and it is a very fragile thing. You must be kind to everyone. Your values, and where you stand on ethical issues must be seen in your business. This will create stronger relationships and will inspire others. So avoid being generic, strictly business like a machine. Show your humanity, people like it.


 

The first venture an person has is the "higher education" of entrepreneurs. Many of the mistakes above are made, and many hard lessons are learned. But those who actively seek out feedback and remain teachable are going to be positioned to excel much faster and with much less pain. 

Is there a mistake you have made as a young entrepreneur? Perhaps you would like to share it with us in the comments and help others avoid it.

 

Topics: Marketing Strategy

For the love of games and startups: why I sponsor DreamHacks Hackathon

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 24 September 2014

I love gaming.

I still remember the first time I played Tomb Raider. I know exactly which level I got stuck on forever and almost had a nervous breakdown with my friend as we borrowed her older brothers Playstation and played for days.

I still remember spending an entire summer with my friend playing Zelda on my GameBoy. The fat, old kind, not the slim, fancy GameBoy Color.

I've played every COD, Battlefield, Resident Evil, Army of Two and Mass Effect. With ridiculous excitement.

And I've played way too many hotel tycoon, business tycoon, train tycoon, sim cities and other goal oriented city-building games.

My best friend and I are so loud when we play co-op that his wife usually goes to a movie or bowling to be free of our shouting.

"Cover me!"

"Don't take all the sniper ammo!"

"Where are you? Why are you sneaking over there? I'm here all alone with 5 shots left and there is a Big Dude coming! Get over here!"

And I still remember playing the last version of Farm Frenzy on my Ipad. (Which was yestarday...) Because I played all versions on my iPhone already. I guess I can contribute the time-sensitive strategy games to my entrepreneurial nature, I love game where you have to think strategically and have minimal time doing so before you have to make a decision)

I'm a complete movie and game nerd. But games still beat everything else; music, film, design, illustration, art etc.


Because it's a movie where I get to be part of the story and characters journey. Where my friends get to be part of the story.

1.It's music composed to characters and stories I love.

Like these 9749 songs on this Video Game Music Playlist

Or Swedish orchestra fenomena Score, which travels around Europe playing game music live for game fans and classical music fans alike.


2. It's landscape art and illustrations with beautiful dystopian deserts, cities and deep forests:

Albion_1920

Illustrations from Battlefield.


3. It's storytelling with exciting twists and turns not confided to the Hollywood's 1 hour and 30 minutes plot.

Minecraft players avarage playtime: 1760,25 hours.

274:16
274:16

4. It's software and hardware innovation at it's finest.

OculusRift

The Oculus Rift.

How OculusRift will change more than the gaming industry.


5. It's art direction of 40 hour adventures, not 3 minute commercials.

Mirrors-Edge-2
The beautiful city landscapes of Mirror's Edge


6. It's educational games, using all the learnings techniques at once to help kids learn writing, reading and math. Actually getting them excited about learning, not putting them down.

toca

Yes, that right, that's Toca Boca House teaching yout kids how FUN cleaning is. Don't you wish you'd been taught that too?

peppy-pals-trosta

Peppy Pals teaching kids emotional intelligence and anti-bullying behaviors.

7. It's pondering about making moral decisions and what it takes to be a leader. And what would happen if we actually had an apocalyptic event?

Like playing Mad Max and handling escaping a post-apocalyps wasteland.

2013_06_Mass-Effect-Wallpaper-Background-Games-HD

And yes, how we would survive in a post-apocalyptic landscape is actually a topic of discussion for gamers. How would we deal with it?

8. When the movie has ended, you can play 40 hours with your favorite character and explore where they came from and how they became who they are.

The_Chronicles_of_Riddick,_Escape_From_Butcher_Bay

The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay. Started with the movie Pitch Black in 2000 and ended with several games and several movies more.

9. It's the Lego of the 21st century, teaching kids to build things.

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Spacestation built in Minecraft.

10. And Oh, I forgot to tell you, all the examples of games above are developed in Sweden except Oculus Rift. But I'm betting a lot of swedish game developers will use it in the years to come to develop new innovative games.
Most of my gamer friends already owns one.

This little tiny country packs a lot of digital punch.
1 in 10 people in the world have played a Swedish game.

The gaming industry brings in millions and millions in taxes to Sweden and creates thousands of jobs and drives many parts of our technical advancements and is soon the driver for change of our school system that is long over due.

So yes, creating more entrepreneurs in the field of game development is not only something I'm passionate about. I think it's our duty to contribute to the entrepreneurial spirit in the business, because that's part of Swedens future.

Boom. There you have it. My very dramatic post about why the swedish game industry is super duper important and why giving the opportunity for acceleration for the winners of the DreamHack Hackathon is not only fun for my company Cedarwood and for me personally, it's just what I should do as a Swedish entrepreneur and business developer.  See you at Globen Arena!

 

Give you comments below about the game industry and startups within this field! Or rant about your passion for games too!

Topics: Marketing Strategy

The power of 3 for entrepreneurs

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 10 September 2014

The power of 3 for entrepreneurs.
30 minutes, 3 tasks, 3 months and 3 dimensions.
A method to the madness of dealing with running a startup.

30 minutes, 3 tasks, 3 months and 3 dimensions.
A method to the madness of dealing with running a startup.

I want to introduce your to some tools.

Tools to structure your time and efficiency as a startup entrepreneur or executive.
Actually, whatever role you have, try these out, and see the difference.

Just stop stressing out.
Stop getting anxious about not completing your tasks.
Stop worrying about if your doing the right things.
Just stop freaking out (with a little help from these tools).

I always liked the aestetics of three. Ever since I started studying japanese and chinese language, society, art, businessculture and more at the age of 16. (Yes, I studied both japanese and chinese, such a nerd.)

You see, in japanese Ikebana (flower art arrangements), the compositions consists of three main stems. And when arranging pretty much anything it should come in three, or in uneven numbers in japanese philosophy. It catches the eye. You look for the balance between the three. Instead of having two equal sides that mirror eachother and soon become boring, the combination of three keeps your eyes looking for connections. It keeps you exploring the aestetics for longer.

This is just common sense really. Which should be more common.

Whenever stressed out seasoned entrepreneurs come to me for strategy advice and growth planning, I asked them about their weekly planning. How does their week, month, year look like? Often, there is no framework to follow.

And when I meet young entrepreneurs, fresh out of programming or design school, I start by drawing things on my boards to show them how to cut their long road ahead into little bit-sized pieces.

You seriously have to find a method to divide up your daily, weekly, monthly and yearly planning.
Otherwise you'll overwhelm your brain and not feed it information in a way your brain wants it.

Do your brain a favor and try out my Power Of 3 method.

30 Minutes cycles: creating positive stress to build minimum viable products.

StartupCabin - Pomodoro Technique

I learned this pomodoro-like technique from a ADHD-specialist. Because our lives look like the inside of the brain of a person with ADHD today. Full with distraction of popups, sound, images, streams of twitter, facebook etc. So applying ADHD focus methods is a great idea. They're made to help you pretty much deal with the life of an internet nerd. Yatta!

In short:

  • Set a task. Define on paper or in your head what you need to do to make it just good enough to work. (deliver a minimum viable product)
  • Put on a timer. (it's in your smartphone, just bring out the clock app and use it)
  • Set it to 30 Minutes. (some prefer 20 minutes, others 25 minutes)
  • Now Go!
  • Try to finish the most important parts first and finish it in 30 minutes.
  • Then take a 2 minute break and drink some coffee or pet your office dog.
  • Then start a new task and put the timer on again.

By shortening your deadlines you force your brain to focus on getting the task done and what the most important elements are. Your brain loves to sprint like this. And you'll train yourself to think smarter and work more on the important things, instead of getting stuck.

If you like a more triggering tool to use than your phone, try out Focus Booster. I use it every day. I've written this post with Focus Boost batches of 20 minutes with 2 minute breaks.

Here's a book on the subject also:
Pomodoro Technique Illustrated (Pragmatic Life)

3 Tasks To Do List: How to focus and stop freaking out over your endless to-do list.

StartupCabin - 3 tasks - Get Things Done

 
I learned the Get Things Done method when I was a freshman at Stockholm University. I'm a list creator. I love writing lists. Especially after really making a strategy of it. Now I can teach even non-list-lovers how to actually start using it for the greater good of their mental stability.

Whenever my co-workers are stressed out, I tell them:

In short:

  • Write down a list of everything that is rumbling around in your head causing havoc.
    Get your stressed out thoughts down on paper and "relieve" your brain of having to remember it.
  • Scratch everything you can not personally do something about this week.
  • Scratch everything that doesn't make your company money or deliver service to your clients/customers.
  • Mark the 3 most important things to do right now.
  • Do only those 3 today. Everything else you save for tomorrow.

Everything except the 3 most important things for your company is irrelevant work. A waste of your time.
It's tough to learn this. But you'll feel so much better by just starting to incorporate this into your routine. Always ask yourself: "Is this the most important thing for my company to do right now?"

See the Get Things Done book here if you haven't seen the method before:
Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

 

The 3 Month Circle: the cycle of an entrepreneur's year.

StartupCabin - The 3 month entrepreneurs cycle
 

The cycle of goalsetting and planning that I use for my clients are divided into four sections of three month batches.

There is a reason the year is divided into quarters of 3 months in the corporate world. Or that sports teams train for the next game, not for next year's season. Or that the LEAN process forces you to continually iterate. We need feedback-loops that are close enough in time so we can wrap our minds around it and stay motivated. A year is too long!

If you make a new years resolution to get fit until next year, you won't start until the deadline is close. 3 months from deadline you'll still have time to get some results. One month before is to little time and 2 months is not enough to get a good routine.

 

In short:

  • Start setting your goals in 3 month batches. Preferably only 3 goals per quarter.
  • Set 1-year or 3-year or 5-year goals, but divide them into 3 month smaller goals to get to your grand finale. It forces you to actually put up action goals, not only dream goals, without feeling overwhelmed.
  • Plan your schedule in 3 month batchers. Who do you want to meet the next 3 months? Which new clients do you want? How many users will you gain in 3 months? Start working towards 3 month goals with your team.

The 3 dimensions of communication: how to get through the tough conversations.

3_communication_StartupCabin

I learned communications theory at the university like the classic model above, Sender, Medium, Reciever. But I learned an even more clever version of it through one of my mentors, Bob.
There are many other parts of communication where the power of 3 works wonders.

Bob told the story about a couple getting divorced. Instead of focusing on the issues that needed to be solved to finalize the divorce, they focused on each other's personalities. What was wrong with the other person. They focused on their own anger and irritation with the other. Until someone helped them focus on the third dimension of their communication: the problem to be solved, not the people. They got back to looking at how to divorce instead of why they divorced. And suddenly was able to save their family a lot of pain by making it a quicker and less hateful process.

Whenever one works in a team and you need to solve personal or professional issues going on in the group, focus on the third dimension of your communication. Not the sender. Not the reciever, the problem that needs to be solved. It's so easy to solve interpersonal communication issues when you actually take the roles of teammates solving a joint issue. Nobody wants to argue or give destructive feedback. Solve problems with a team attitude. And if it doesn't work, put a third one in the game, a Medium. Which can be another teammate, a process leader or coach for example. Just realize that focusing on and thinking that sitting on the opposide sides of the table won't work.



Know of more "powers of 3" methods you want to share? Comment below!

Topics: Marketing Strategy

4 apps teaching you to bootstrap your personal finances

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 13 July 2014

4 apps to start teaching yourself better financial habits now. You'll thank yourself as a person and entrepreneur later.

Start with bootstrapping your own budget first, then your company.

The market for financial apps for companies are not yet that developed.
But there are plenty of great personal finance apps that help you budget your life and start to understand your spending habits and the impact it has.

Use them. Draw insights from it.
Teach yourself to bootstrap you personal finances and see the effect. Then you can start applying it on your company. Starting on a smaller scale will just make it that much easier to apply it in business later.

1. Tink

Screenshot_2014-07-13_13.38.09

Tink is a swedish startup founded by Daniel Kjellén and Fredrik Hedberg. They got 50 000 users (even more downloads) the first week after launching. The app makes it pretty easy with automated categories and simple ways to put up budgets and get notifications if you are about to go over your budget. Click the picture to see their features.

2. Toshl.com

Screenshot_2014-07-13_13.38.38

I met the guys behind Toshl when I was living in San Francisco in 2012. We met at their celebration party for getting a spot at 500 Startups, the well-known accelerator for Silicon Valley startups. The Toshl founders are actually from Poland, Matic Bitenc and Miha Hribar. The app is very cute and friendly in it's tonality which differs alot from other finance apps. Click the picture to see their features.

3. Qapital.com

Screenshot_2014-07-13_13.37.33

Swedish startup founded by Erik Akterin, George Friedman. What I'm missing on their site is a blog about personal finance, that teach you more about what you can do to become a better budgeteer. Similar to Tink they link to your bank, categorize the purchases and help you set budgets. The founders actually met when working at Avanza, on of Swedens largest online banks, developing their platform. Click the picture to see their features.

4. Mint.com

Screenshot_2014-07-13_13.37.41

Mint.com is the largest one in this market. An american startup that, event if you don't want to use it, has a great blog to learn more about personal finances. I wish the other finance apps would do this and create great lists on how users can maxmimize their use of the apps. Click the picture to see their features.

 

Read more about how latte taught me to bootstrap my companies.

 

 

 


xuemeirhodinphotoXue Mei Rhodin is a multi-entrepreneur, founder/CEO and business strategy adviser at Cedarwood.co and several other companies. When she’s not speaking to an audience, sketching roadmaps for her clients or building new companies, you’ll find her with the bulldogs, the newest FPS games and the champagne.
Follow her on Twitter, LinkedIn, Meetup.com, AngelList, f6s and Google+



Know more european finance startups that we should mention? Comment below!

Topics: Finance & Forecast, Marketing Strategy

How a cup of latte taught me to bootstrap my companies.

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 13 July 2014

How a cup of latte taught me to bootstrap my companies and why financial education will effect your attractiveness to investors.

 

boothstrappingstartups

The status of financial education is catastrophic.
I mean, Ptich Black sci-fi monster cave kind of scary and dark.

Most people get no financial habits from home to help them understand money. And school does nothing. NOTHING. Learning to calculate does not equal being able to understand the risk of buying an apartment, how to save for retirement and study the market.

People don't even know how they spend their money a regular month.

The debt from completely useless loans like consumption textmessage-loans etc have skyrockeded the last couple of years.

Why you should learn to bootstrap your personal finances.

I did an experiment when I was still at the university.
This was before we had all of these fantastic tools to help us out. I thaught myself to see what I actually spent money on and what consequences it had.


I counted everything I bought for three months. the result? I spent 414 USD (305 EURO/ 3000 SEK) a month on LATTE. Over-prized coffee. As a student. It chocked me.

An experience that stuck with me through out the years. I sat every day at my favorite café, studying. And I loved it. But the experience was not worth that much money. Not to a student. It was a learning experience. That kind of shock-moment you need for something to stay with you for the rest of your life.

I think of it as "Latte Money". Irrelevant consumption that is not evergreen and that doesn't provide anything for the long perspective. I look at something I want for my company or myself and then I ask myself "do we really need this? Will it make my company or myself money or is it just consumtion for the moment?". Is it just Latte Money?

I did a lot of experiments around income and money during that time. To challange myself to see the value of things around me. I read a lot on personal finance books and learned what the experts knew to avoid. I felt it was important for my development as an entrepreneur to really understand money around me as a person, so that I could expand my context in terms of money as an entrepreneur too. To understand what old myths about money that I'd learned and needed to un-learn.
It's helping me every day to see things others don't see and to design my life in a smart way.

Why bootstrapping experience matters to your startup and to investors.

I managed to bootstrap all of my companies. Actually non of them ever lost money. And I've had companies since I was 18 years old. Something that I can tell you will impress an investor. They want to see that you as an entrepreneur can manage the money they risk by putting them in your company, and effectively, in your hands.

What it tells the investors is "if this person can do this with a company without any invested money, imagen what he/she would do if I put 100 000 USD (73 560 EURO) in their hands." Probably a lot more than someone who never had any experience from bootstrapping before.

By having bootstrapping experience, you have the skills to make money work harder for you.

Have you challenged yourself in your views about money? What did you parents teach your or didn't teach you about money? And can you make it work for you or a company?

Recently I sat at a pitch event in Stockholm and the investors on stage where asked what they thought startup-founders where lacking the most. Their answer was "financial knowledge". And as CEO of Cedarwood, where we help startups and companies not only with business advice but with financial strategy and CFO's specfically, we see the need.


Start educating yourself. Here are 4 apps teaching you how to bootstrap your personal finances.

 

 

 


xuemeirhodinphotoXue Mei Rhodin is a multi-entrepreneur, founder/CEO and business strategy adviser at Cedarwood.co and several other companies. When she’s not speaking to an audience, sketching roadmaps for her clients or building new companies, you’ll find her with the bulldogs, the newest FPS games and the champagne.
Follow her on Twitter, LinkedIn, Meetup.com, AngelList, f6s and Google+

 



Got your own story about boothstrapping lessons? Comment below!

Topics: Finance & Forecast, Marketing Strategy

Jeff Bezos must-read business book toplist for Amazon executives.

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 09 July 2014

This is the list of books one of the smartest and most successfull internet-entrepreneurs of all time forces his executives to read.
So my curiosity got the best of me and we added them to our company's reading list. It's already given us tons of great methods and topics to talk about regarding our company's strategy.

5129303018_53dd74260d_b
photo by Steve Jurvetson

Jeff Bezos (Jeffrey Preston "Jeff" Bezos) is one of the most powerful CEOs of our time, building, running and owning 20% of Amazon.com, the multi-product category e-commerce site that is taking over the west world. (Alibaba's TaoBao already own the chinese market so Amazon has no chance there.)

Amazon.com grew 55% 2013 and Jeff himself is said to have a networth of 30.6 Billion USD according to Forbes. He's definitley doing something right as an entrepreneur.

I found Jeff Bezos business book list a while ago, and we started reading from it together at my company Cedarwood. And I'm telling you, these titles are not there by accident. It's some of the smartest and most valuable insights I've found in modern business strategy literature. And it's part of my job as a business strategist to read tons of this kind of literature.

This is the list of books one of the smartest and most successfull internet-entrepreneurs of all time forces his executives to read.
So my curiosity got the best of me and we added them to our company's reading list. It's already given us tons of great methods and topics to talk about regarding our company's strategy.

I've included direct links to amazon, as it's the simplest way to buy the books. I prefer reading on the Kindle app on my iPad or Samsung Galaxy or using Audible for audiobooks.

 



1. Lean thinking: banish waste and create wealth in your corporation. By James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones.

Most startup founders know by now about Lean models, scrum and other iteration models. But I still meet entrepreneurs who don't know. I personally think lean could benefit many more industries than just tech and IT.

You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation


2. The Goal: a process of ongoing improvement. By Eliyahu M Goldratt and Jeff Cox.

Focused on the Theory of Constraints, this books shows you how to adress productivity and quality problems in your company.

You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement

 

3. Data-driven marketing: the 15 metrics everyone in marketing should know. By Mark Jeffery.

The era of immature social media marketing is soon over. More and more companies are realizing the huge opportunity in data analytics and how crucial it is in finding he right goals to measure your marketing efforts. I wish more small companies and startups would out effort into setting real goals and measure their marketing.

You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

Data-Driven Marketing: The 15 Metrics Everyone in Marketing Should Know

 

4. Good to great: why some companies make the leap... and others don't. By Jim Collins.

Good to Great shares the revolutionary research conducted by Jim Collins and his team covering the topic of going from being a good company to a great company. How to outshine the competition and the market by tenfold and stay there. For 15 years or more.

You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't

 Good-to-Great-1

5. Build to last: succesful habits of visionary companies. By Jim Collins.

Just as Good to Great, Collins get to the bottom of how to build sustainable businesses. And the reserach is as surprising as Good to Great.

You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies (Harper Business Essentials)

6. The innovator's dilemma: the revolutionary book that will change the way you do business. By Clayton M. Christensen.

Outstanding companies can do everything right and still lose their market leadership—or worse, disappear altogether. Focusing on “disruptive technology,” Christensen shows why most companies miss out on new waves of innovation and how companies should stay in the game.

You can buy it as a paperback copy here at amazon:

The Innovator's Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book That Will Change the Way You Do Business

 

7. The black swan: the impact of the highly improbable fagility. By Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

An investigation of opacity, luck, uncertainty, probability, human error, risk, and decision-making in a world we don’t understand.

You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Fragility" (Incerto)


8. Sam Walton: made in America. By Sam Walton and John Huey.

Sam Walton, the founder of Wal-Mart empire, tells the story of how he revolutionized the retail industry.

You can buy it as an e-book or hardcover copy here at amazon:

Sam Walton: Made In America

 

9. Memos from the Chairman. By Alan C. Greenberg

A curious collection of investment bank Bear Stearns chairman's memos to the company employees, showing a unique take on leadership and management in a traditional industry.

You can buy it as a hardcover copy here at amazon:

Memos from the Chairman

 

10. The mythical man-month: essays on software engineering. By Frederick P. Brooks Jr.

An influental book on software management in large project, mixing opinions with software engineering facts and showing the reader what mistakes and problem occur when handeling massive software systems.

You can buy it as a hardcover copy here at amazon:

The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, Anniversary Edition (2nd Edition)

 

11. The remains of the day. By Kazuo Ishiguro.

Very different from the rest of the list, Bezos also included this classic novel of an english butler looking back at his life serving "a great gentleman". That this book is included and has at first glanze nothing to do with business make you wonder if he put it in because it's his favorite story or if the morale of it is important to amazon culture.
You can buy it as an e-book, audiobook or hardcover copy here at amazon:

The Remains of the Day (Vintage International)


12. Creation: Life and how to make it. By Steve Grand.

This is personally an exstemely exciting book, not because it's a book about business, but because it's a book about one of my most loved PC games I played as a teen and a game that had truly unique qualities for being released in the 90's. He built an artificial intellifence engine to produce the little creatures you feed, teach and interact with in the game. Real artificial intelligence, with their own hormonal systems, personalitites and inherit traits from their parents.
Working mostly alone, almost single-handedly writing 250,000 lines of computer code, Steve Grand produced Creatures®, a revolutionary computer game that allowed players to create living beings complete with brains, genes, and hormonal systems.

You can buy it as a hardcover copy here at amazon:

Creation: Life and How to Make It



 

How to make these books usable to you and your business.


So these are great books, that's clear, but how will you be able to apply it?
You can follow the links in the blogpost, buy the books and read them yourself.
Or you can hire a good strategist to help you implement it faster.


If you want tips on how to hack your should-read-pile and work smarter with educating yourself and your team, I suggest you read the post 5 ways to get through your book reading list 10 times as faster.

Or join our 30 day audiobook and podcast challenge: #30DayAudioChallenge.

 


xuemeirhodinphotoXue Mei Rhodin is a multi-entrepreneur, founder/CEO and business strategy adviser at Cedarwood.co and several other companies. When she’s not speaking to an audience, sketching roadmaps for her clients or building new companies, you’ll find her with the bulldogs, the newest FPS games and the champagne.
Follow her on Twitter, LinkedIn, Meetup.com, AngelList, f6s and Google+

Topics: Teams & Tribes, Leadership & Mindset, Marketing Strategy

Interview with Ashkan Fardost on science, arduino and hacking music PR

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 09 July 2014


Xue Mei Rhodin interviewing Ashkan Fardost about science, arduino, hacking music industry's PR and the future of our jobs. What you don't know about science, happening right now, and how to hack the music industries PR and co-produce for Tiesto.


image


Xue Mei: Hi Ashkan!
Scientist, music entrepreneur and futurist.
Can you tell our blog readers what you do during the days?

Ashkan: Hello Xue Mei! 
My daytime activities include being a scientist in the research labs of Uppsala University, within the fields of organic and medicinal chemistry.

Xue Mei: You also run the music production company Slippy Fish, how did that happen?

Ashkan: It was the result of a series of weird events during the early days of the Internet. It involves an elaborate marketing scheme on the Napster network, followed by the caveman edition of a Kickstarter campaign (caveman edition because it was 2002, the days when Kickstarter didn't yet exist and whether to use Altavista or Google was a hot topic).

Xue Mei: That sounds like a great journey. What kind of clients/collaborationpartners have you had in Slippy Fish?

Ashkan: I've had the honour to sign music to labels like Armada Music and publishing houses such as EMI. Artist collaborations and album features involve names such as Armin van Buuren, DJ Tiësto and ATB.

Xue Mei: What's the most unexpected that has happened with your journey as a music entrepreneur with Slippy Fish?

Ashkan: The way it was actually founded, which I'd love to tell you a little bit about at the Cedarwood Meetup on May 2nd!

Xue Mei: Last time we spoke you where gonna get to try out Spotify's new studio! How did that go?
 
Ashkan: It was fantastic, equipped to the bones with all the instruments and tools you'd need to produce an international hit record. Can't wait until our next session!
 
Xue Mei: You've also developed your own wearable with Arduino, what was that and why did you create it?
 
Ashkan: The working title for it was FLIPR, a wearable for the wrist that replaces presentation clickers. The idea was that a presenter relies heavily on body language to convey a message to an audience. But with one hand busy holding the clicker, your body language is heavily reduced. The project made it through the prototype and design phase (I'll show you on May the 2nd) but was cancelled when Thalmic announced their product "Myo". It does everything the FLIPR would do plus a hundred more things, a hundred times better!
On a side note: that's why I love to have several projects alive within totally different fields: if a project fails, it won't be detrimental, and when a project succeeds, it fuels your other projects. Failure is essential, but backup plans are bad for creativity in my opinion. I rely on synergy instead.

Xue Mei: Did you have previous experience with Arduino when you started out?

Ashkan: None. I was a total newbie with no programming or electronic skills, except for VERY basic HTML á la ugly web pages from the 90's (remember AngelFire and Geocities, anyone?).
 
Xue Mei: Arduino has gotten a lot of people curious about learning to code and learning how to build tangible technology. What was hardest with trying out arduino and developing something with it?
 
 Ashkan: To stop buying new components and sensors that you can connect to it. Once you realize how powerful it is, you also realize how endless the possibilities are. That was a "problem" that made it hard to focus on the task at hand, but it sure as hell made things a lot of fun! (Disclaimer: I'm in no way affiliated with Arduino and have no financial interests related to it what so ever)
 
Xue Mei: Do you have any other projects at the moment?
 
Ashkan: Right now I'm focusing on finishing three research projects within the coming year, after which I will take a break from academia in order to pursuit some other things. I'm also in the process of launching a new music venture as a result of two extremely talented artists that I'm collaborating with, with the aim of launching them into the international music scene within this year. I'm also making a Swedish pop music project which will be launched by the end of May, with a music video and the whole package.
 
Xue Mei: Great! Look forward to seeing that! 
You're gonna hold a talk at our Cedarwood Meetup the 2nd of May. What are you gonna talk about?
 
Ashkan: I'm going to talk about how the exponential progress of technology is changing our lives faster than ever, and how our world might be radically different just ten years from now as a result of this. I will then show how disruption by technology allows newcomers to succeed like never before, while it destroys old school thinkers in the blink of an eye. My goal is to demonstrate how we can leverage technology and disruption to become winners instead of grumpy losers. Because I firmly believe that disruption is an inevitable force that you must learn to dance with and embrace, rather than resist.

Xue Mei: Why do you hold talks about this?
 
Ashkan: Because technology and disruption allowed people like me to succeed in an industry previously only available to people privileged with deep connections and/or luck. Also, as a scientist, I'm at the forefront of technological progress and it's my duty to figure out what technologies will be needed ten years from now in order to plan my research. These two experiences and interests are intertwined into the talk that I'll give.
 
Xue Mei: What do you think will be the audience big takeaway from your talk?

Ashkan: My goal is to have every member of the audience to walk away with a brand new way of looking at things. A new way in terms of realizing that technology has changed everything about how we see life and how we define the possible vs. the impossible. Because frankly speaking, everything is a possibility now. The textbook excuses of lacking opportunities, capital, connections, knowledge and what not, are no longer valid. The only thing you can lack is guts, and I hope my talk will inspire a little bit of guts.


Find Ashkan Fardost here:

Twitter: @rymdskepp

 



Become a member of our startup meetup in Stockholm.

Join our free monthly meetups for startups, techies and creatives in Stockholm

 

Topics: Marketing Strategy

Cedarwood Meetup: Entrepreneur 2.0 and Science news: the last 50 days.

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 09 July 2014

Me and Ashkan promised all of the attendees at the latest Cedarwood Meetup that we’d post the summary of all the interesting things discussed during Ashkan’s talk and the discussion afterwards.
Thank you all for a great evening!


REFERENCES FOR Entrepreneur 2.0:
“SCIENCE & TECH NEWS: THE LAST 50 DAYS”


Geckskin adhesive now compatible with real world surfaces:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201306259
Spinoff company website: http://geckskin.umass.edu
High-energy laser for triggering rain or lightning:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.47
Replacing defective genes:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.2884
Stick-on electronic patches:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1250169
Three-photon quantum communication:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.50
Real-time functional brain imaging (“Glass Brain”):
NeuroScape company website: http://neuroscapelab.com
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7HwPdXJlL0


Cloaked DNA nanodevices:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn5011914
 

OTHER RESOURCES

IBM’s supercomputer with human brain complexity: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ3HEVelBFY
IBM’s Watson supercomputer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxU1Pg-80as
Honda’s humanoid robot “Asimo”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZngYDDDfW4
Google’s driverless car: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdgQpa1pUUE
Computerization of jobs the next 20 years (University of Oxford) http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/publications/view/1314 (see page 37 for the graph)



Now go and watch the videos and read the articles and be amazed what has happened in science the last 50 days. Enjoy!
- See more at: http://blog.cedarwood.co/#sthash.fWH6VK9Q.dpuf
Me and Ashkan promised all of the attendees at the latest Cedarwood Meetup that we’d post the summary of all the interesting things discussed during Ashkan’s talk and the discussion afterwards.
Thank you all for a great evening!


REFERENCES FOR Entrepreneur 2.0:
“SCIENCE & TECH NEWS: THE LAST 50 DAYS”


Geckskin adhesive now compatible with real world surfaces:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201306259
Spinoff company website: http://geckskin.umass.edu
High-energy laser for triggering rain or lightning:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.47
Replacing defective genes:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.2884
Stick-on electronic patches:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1250169
Three-photon quantum communication:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.50
Real-time functional brain imaging (“Glass Brain”):
NeuroScape company website: http://neuroscapelab.com
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7HwPdXJlL0


Cloaked DNA nanodevices:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn5011914
 

OTHER RESOURCES

IBM’s supercomputer with human brain complexity: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ3HEVelBFY
IBM’s Watson supercomputer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxU1Pg-80as
Honda’s humanoid robot “Asimo”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZngYDDDfW4
Google’s driverless car: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdgQpa1pUUE
Computerization of jobs the next 20 years (University of Oxford) http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/publications/view/1314 (see page 37 for the graph)



Now go and watch the videos and read the articles and be amazed what has happened in science the last 50 days. Enjoy!
- See more at: http://blog.cedarwood.co/#sthash.fWH6VK9Q.dpuf
Me and Ashkan promised all of the attendees at the latest Cedarwood Meetup that we’d post the summary of all the interesting things discussed during Ashkan’s talk and the discussion afterwards.
Thank you all for a great evening!


REFERENCES FOR Entrepreneur 2.0:
“SCIENCE & TECH NEWS: THE LAST 50 DAYS”


Geckskin adhesive now compatible with real world surfaces:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201306259
Spinoff company website: http://geckskin.umass.edu
High-energy laser for triggering rain or lightning:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.47
Replacing defective genes:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.2884
Stick-on electronic patches:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1250169
Three-photon quantum communication:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.50
Real-time functional brain imaging (“Glass Brain”):
NeuroScape company website: http://neuroscapelab.com
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7HwPdXJlL0


Cloaked DNA nanodevices:
Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn5011914
 

OTHER RESOURCES

IBM’s supercomputer with human brain complexity: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ3HEVelBFY
IBM’s Watson supercomputer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxU1Pg-80as
Honda’s humanoid robot “Asimo”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZngYDDDfW4
Google’s driverless car: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdgQpa1pUUE
Computerization of jobs the next 20 years (University of Oxford) http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/publications/view/1314 (see page 37 for the graph)



Now go and watch the videos and read the articles and be amazed what has happened in science the last 50 days. Enjoy!
- See more at: http://blog.cedarwood.co/#sthash.fWH6VK9Q.dpuf
Me and Ashkan promised all of the attendees at the latest Meetup that we'd post the summary of all the interesting things discussed during Ashkan's talk and the discussion afterwards.
Thank you all for a great evening!
600Invite_Cedarwood_Meetup_Ashkan_Fardost

Entrepreneur 2.0 - Science and tech news: the last 50 days references from meetup 2nd of May 2014:

Geckskin adhesive now compatible with real world surfaces:

Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201306259
Spinoff company website: http://geckskin.umass.edu

High-energy laser for triggering rain or lightning:

Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.47

Replacing defective genes:

Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.2884

Stick-on electronic patches:

Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1250169

Three-photon quantum communication:

Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.50

Real-time functional brain imaging (“Glass Brain”):

Cloaked DNA nanodevices:

Peer-reviewed scientific report: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn5011914

OTHER RESOURCES

IBM’s supercomputer with human brain complexity: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ3HEVelBFY
IBM’s Watson supercomputer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxU1Pg-80as
Honda’s humanoid robot “Asimo”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZngYDDDfW4
Google’s driverless car: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdgQpa1pUUE
Computerization of jobs the next 20 years (University of Oxford) http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/publications/view/1314 (see page 37 for the graph)


Now go and watch the videos and read the articles and be amazed what has happened in science the last 50 days while you where re-watching all episodes of Lost. Enjoy!
 


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and meet sweet startup people?
Join our free monthly meetups for startups, techies and creatives in Stockholm




Topics: Marketing Strategy

Inside the head of an startup investor - Video

Posted by Xue Mei Rhodin on 09 July 2014


 

Startup Day 2012 video - Nikolaj Nyholm - Inside the head of an investor.

Nikolaj Nyholm, General Partner at Sunstone Capital shares insights into what to do and what not to do when raising capital as a startup from venture capital firms.

Topics: Marketing Strategy

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